The winners of the 2014 NetSCI Summer Research Grant Awards were announced at the beginning of this month of June. Each of the three winners, Heewon Kim, Eunkyung Song, and Jack Harris, will receive $1000 award to help with the cost of  carrying out their exciting research projects.

Heewon Kim is a doctoral candidate in the School of Communication and Information at Rutgers University. She is currently working on her dissertation, which aims to disentangle paradoxical influences of social technology use on knowledge sharing in a global high-tech organization. The research project for which she receives a NetSCI grant, Emergence of knowledge networks in a distributed organization, constitutes a part of her dissertation, where she examines the formation of boundary-crossing knowledge networks through the use of social technology.

Heewon Kim

Eunkyung Song, a doctoral candidate in Sociology at Rutgers University, is currently working on her dissertation, Power from the Fingertips: Writing Alone and Working Together in Digital Media in Koreawhich examines how digital interaction shapes political mobilization and solidarity. She studies the 2008 Candlelight Protests that originated in an effort to stop the Korean government from undercutting inspection standards to import beef from the United States amidst concerns over Mad Cow disease. In so doing, she pursues to understand a complex mix of abundant online protest expressed through texts and massive street protests expressed through both speeches and events like rallies and marches. The study for which she receives a NetSCI grant, The Meaning of Mad Cow Disease and Democracy in the 2008 Candlelight Protests, Korea, constitutes a part of her dissertation and focuses on semantic networks of digital postings.

Eunkyong song

Jack Harris is a doctoral student and research fellow at Rutgers University’s School of Communication and Information. Jack’s research focuses on three areas: (1) the stakeholder and community relationships impacting long-term recovery from disaster, (2) high-resiliency organizational networks, and (3) intractable policy controversies in environmental and food systems. The project for which he receives a NetSCI grant, Embedded networks and community stakeholders in disaster response, examines the development of existing and emergent stakeholder networks and interorganizational relationships among nonprofits and other organizations in post-Sandy New Jersey.

Jack Harris